VIDEO Learn About The Towns New Effort To Increase Affordable Housing In

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — On the latest episode of Wilmington Community Television’s “Town Topics,” host and WCTV Executive Director Shaun Neville sat down with Wilmington’s Planning Director Valerie Gingrich to discuss inclusionary zoning.“Inclusionary zoning is a requirement that affordable housing units be constructed when housing units are built in general,” explained Gingrich. “It’s a requirement that affordable units be part of a development.”Wilmington does not currently have an inclusionary zoning bylaw. All but one of its neighboring towns, however, do already have such a bylaw in place.“Most towns across the state have it,” said Gingrich. “It’s not a new idea. It’s been talked about here in the past.”Gingrich and Neville got into the details of the draft of a inclusionary zoning bylaw that voters will likely be asked to approve at May’s Annual Town Meeting.“As the draft currently stands, the requirement would be any multi-family (condos, apartments, duplexes) developments that are 8 units or more, would be required to provide 15% of their units as affordable,” said Gingrich. If 20 units were proposed, under the bylaw, 3 would need to be designated as affordable.Builders could take advantage of a “density bonus” — an additional market-rate (regular) unit would be allowed (added) for every affordable unit built. The bonus helps offset the loss that the developer endures by selling a unit at less than market value.So, if 20 units were proposed, and 3 were affordable, the developer could add 3 additional market value units, for a total of 23 units.Additional details are included in the draft, which is posted HERE on the Department of Planning & Conservation page of the town’s website.Gingrich encourages comments, questions, or suggestions. She can be reached at vgingrich@wilmingtonma.gov or 978-658-8238.Watch the 15-minute interview, courtesy of Wilmington Community Television, below:—Video Playerhttp://wilmington.vod.castus.tv/vod/dl.php/e/6/4/3/6/b/e6436b23-4c4a-49e3-a72a-3559107de4f01546546324.651+51329023.694@castus4-wilmington+15466189811546618435113013.vod.720p.20191103_Town_Topics_Inclusionary_Zoning.mp4Media error: Format(s) not supported or source(s) not foundmejs.download-file: http://wilmington.vod.castus.tv/vod/dl.php/e/6/4/3/6/b/e6436b23-4c4a-49e3-a72a-3559107de4f01546546324.651+51329023.694@castus4-wilmington+15466189811546618435113013.vod.720p.20191103_Town_Topics_Inclusionary_Zoning.mp4?_=100:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.—Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedHOT BUTTON ISSUE: Should The Town Prevent New Condos & Apartments From Being Built? Could It Backfire? (Article 1)In “Government”AFFORDABLE HOUSING NEWS: Inclusionary Zoning Bylaw To Go In Front Of Voters, But NOT At This Year’s Town MeetingIn “Government”SELECTMEN RACE Q&A: Fasulo & Eaton Discuss Affordable Housing, Sciarappa FarmIn “Government”last_img read more

Bangladeshi peacekeepers renovate S Sudan football fields

first_imgUNMISS is contributing to the third National Unity Day in Juba by means of its Bangladeshi Engineering Contingent, which is renovating football fields in the capital.Bangladesh’s engineering contingent in South Sudan has been tasked with renovation of football fields to be used for a variety of National Unity Day activities.The Bangladeshi peacekeepers are contributing to youthful festivities, under the umbrella of the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS).The mission said it is supporting this year’s annual National Unity Day by renovating four football fields in Juba.”Hundreds of youths from across the country will get together for sports and other activities to promote inter-ethnic interaction and a spirit of fair play and peace.,” the mission said in a news release.The opening ceremony of the event will be held at the Juba Football Stadium on 27 January and it will end on 4 February.According to the news release, work has already begun on the pitch in Juba-One, with the fields of Buluk, Zahra and St. Paul’s to follow.Officer-in-charge of some of the engineering work, Lieutenant Masud, says the tasks of the contingent will include the grading and levelling of the football grounds, as well as digging drains along their perimeters.Lemor William Joseph, assistant director for youth, training and innovation, a component of the culture, youth and sports ministry of that country, appreciated the efforts of the UN peacekeeping mission.“Actually it is a very great work that UNMISS is doing for us, because really to renovate these fields would have been very expensive,” he said.The Japan International Cooperation Agency, JICA, will finance the logistics of bringing the participating youths to the National Unity Day.During the 2017 edition of the National Unity Day, approximately 500 boys and girls from twelve towns from across South Sudan and Abyei participated in football and athletics competitions.This year youths from all of the states of the country are expected to take part.last_img read more

Record 708m displaced at end of 2018 UN

first_imgChildren stand outside a school used as a shelter for Internally Displaced People (IDP) from northern Burkina Faso on 13 June 2019 in Ouagadougou. Internally Displaced People (IDP) from northern Burkina Faso flee intercommunal clashes, which have already killed a hundred people in a few weeks. Photo: AFPMore than 70 million people were counted last year as displaced from their homes, a record that underestimates the real number of refugees and asylum seekers, the UN said Wednesday.In its annual global trends report, the United Nations refugee agency (UNHCR) described the figure of 70.8 million at the end of 2018 as “conservative”, particularly because the number of people who fled Venezuela’s devastating crisis is undercounted.At the end of 2017, by comparison, 68.5 million people were counted as being forcibly displaced by violence or persecution.The UNHCR attributed the increase partly to surging displacement in Ethiopia caused by inter-ethnic conflict, and in Venezuela, where thousands are fleeing every day amid an economic collapse that has triggered shortages of basic food and medicine.An estimated 3.3 million people have left Venezuela since the start of 2016, according to the UN.UNHCR head Filippo Grandi told reporters in Geneva the figure of 70.8 million only includes Venezuelans who had officially applied for asylum—roughly half a million people.Overall, the number of displaced people in the world has doubled over the last 20 years and now exceeds the population of Thailand.The trend, Grandi said, continues to go in “the wrong direction”.Conflicts ‘never’ end -According to Amnesty International, a refugee is a person who flees their home country and cannot or will not return due to conflict or fear of persecution.The report lists 41.3 million internally displaced people (IDPs), 25.9 million refugees, and 3.5 million asylum seekers—those awaiting a decision on their bid for official refugee protection.The countries with the most internally displaced people—fleeing within their own countries—are Syria, wracked by conflict since 2011 and Colombia, plagued by decades of violence, said the UNHCR.The group of refugees, it added, included 5.5 million Palestinians scattered across several countries, notably Lebanon and Jordan.The best solution for a refugee is to be able to return home once their country stabilises, but Grandi noted that 20 percent have been in exile for more than two decades.“We have become almost unable to make peace,” the UNHCR chief said.“It is true there are new conflicts, new situations producing refugees…, (but) the old ones never get resolved,” he added. “When is the last conflict that you remember was resolved?”‘Praise’ for Germany -The UNHCR has at times sought to push back against the phrase “migrant crisis”, especially as it has been applied to an influx of people into Europe via the Mediterranean sea.The agency has argued that while mass migration does pose serious challenges, it can be managed, particularly by wealthier nations.Grandi praised Germany for its acceptance of migrants and its efforts to “demystify” the notion that migration is unmanageable, “even when the numbers are very big.”“I usually don’t like to praise and criticise but I think in this case, I’d like to praise Germany for what it has done,” said Grandi in Geneva, ahead of the report’s launch in Berlin.He noted that Chancellor Angela Merkel had paid a “heavy price” politically for her openness to migration, arguing this made her actions “even more courageous”.last_img read more

Body Offering

first_imgThe Body in Indian Art, a rich concept of exhibiting the uniqueness of the annals of Indian museology matched with an equally captivating and unconventional design displayed in eight galleries of the National Museum(NM) ended up last week.  With its distinct approach to deck-up, lighting and even acoustics tailor-made for the unusual sequencing of objects, NM turned a new leaf in the history of Indian museology. ‘It has raised the bar of museology in India’, said NM Director-General Venu V. Normally, the concept of design gets subdued under the weight of a phenomenal exhibition, which The Body in Indian Art was. But it is equally true that such a huge event – with over 350 objects on display – needed a brilliant design to crystallize the concept, and the design wing did a tremendous job’, noted Venu. ‘Putting the storyline into use by apt and ideal use of space (in NM) was the task that followed,’ recalled Chatterjee, an alumnus of National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad. He further added, ‘There were only two-and-a-half months left for me to meet the deadline. However, the initial sketches themselves gave high hopes of realising the task.’ Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Ahuja said the unusual sequencing lent certain objects at the BIA interpretations that were completely distinct from Indomania. ‘When we (Ahuja and Chatterjee) moved things in the NM space, new configurations began emerging.’ The design at BIA also went for a massive reinvention vis-à-vis Indomania. For, here a chunk of the expected visitors was closer to the country’s heritage – culturally and geographically. Thus the gallery on ‘Supernatural’ was a longish hall of many-hued stone columns that evoke the famed colonnades of a South Indian temple,  forming a grand setting for the morphed, deformed and divine bodies in that gallery. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixSimilarly, the gallery on ‘rapture’ was set against a painted landscape of grove-like clusters of curved textile surfaces with colours drawn from Ragamala paintings, forming intimately scaled enclosures for these sculptures and miniatures. ‘I believe the visitor experienced a different dissolution of architectural space in the textured, ash-grey gallery on asceticism, carpeted from floor to pedestal to ceiling,’ Chatterjee said. Again, after the gripping darkness of the galleries (painted in black) on death, one entered the second, which was about ‘shunyata’ (nothingness) and the body beyond form. All galleries had their particular harmonic arrangements in response to specific works, themes and spaces — using colour, light, line, material and volume to provide a tonal rhythm within which individual art pieces shone forth, interacting both with other masterpieces and with the visitor’s body. The synthesis of sight and sound was also a striking feature, with music and video installations dispersed throughout the galleries, providing places for rest and contemplation. Several galleries featured specially designed wall-mounted display tables, carefully angled to exhibit miniature paintings worked out with ergonomic attention to Indian body proportions.last_img read more