STATE REP RACE Prinzivalli Pledges To Opt Out Of Pension System

first_imgTEWKSBURY, MA — Below is a press release from the campaign of 19th Middlesex State Representative candidate Pina Prinzivalli (R-Tewksbury):On Monday, Pina Prinzivalli, the Republican nominee for State Representative in the 19th Middlesex District, announced that she will be opting out of the state pension system when elected, calling it the “Give Back Pledge.”“I’m not running to enrich myself with taxpayer dollars,” said Prinzivalli, a 34 year old career professional who has worked in the private sector since she was a teenager. “I hear a lot of candidates, including my opponent Mr. Robertson, say that they’re running because they want to give back. I can’t think of a better way to give back than by opting out of the pension system. As someone who is getting married at the end of next year and has dreams of becoming a mom, I want to make the district the best place to live, work and raise a family. That’s my priority and commitment to you.”In January, Prinzivalli pledged to never vote herself a pay raise and if there is ever an increase in base salary, Prinzivalli will donate the amount to charity.“It’s the right thing to do and standing up for what is right is what my campaign is all about,” said Prinzivalli. “Whether it’s standing up against the boycott of Dandi-Lyons or committing to voting ‘NO’ on becoming a Sanctuary State, I will be a bold voice for the district on Beacon Hill.”Prinzivalli points to the January, 2017 pay raise vote as the reason why she wanted to run for State Rep. Dave Robertson (D-Tewksbury) was chief of staff for the office that voted for the pay raises.“At the debate, my opponent made it perfectly clear that this is a career for him when he announced that he was against term limits,” said Prinzivalli. “It’s time we send someone from the working class, and not the political class to the State House. I want to be your family’s voice on Beacon Hill and that’s why I’m asking for your vote.”Early voting is underway through November 2. The general election is November 6th.Pina Prinzivalli and The Giving Back” Pledge(NOTE: The above press release is from State Rep. Pina Prinzivalli’s campaign.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSTATE REP RACE: Voting Records Show Prinzivalli Voted Only Once Before Launching Candidacy; Campaign DisputesIn “Government”STATE REP RACE: Prinzivalli Campaign Declares Debate Victory; Knocks Robertson On Dandi-Lyons & Sanctuary StateIn “Government”STATE REP RACE: Pina Prinzivalli Speaks At Large GOP Rally, Shares Message On TaxesIn “Government”last_img read more

Texas Senate School Safety Committee Recommends Focusing on Mental Health Avoids Gun

first_img Share Rachel Zein for The Texas TribuneLeft to right: State Sens. Kelly Hancock, R-North Richland Hills, Eddie Lucio Jr., D-Brownville, and John Whitmire, D-Houston, at the second day of hearings held by the Senate Select Committee on Violence in Schools and School Security on June 12, 2018.A special Texas Senate committee devoted to fighting school violence has recommended improving mental health resources for students and increasing funding for a program that arms some members of school staff, but shied away from any measures aiming to limit access to guns.Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, a Republican, formed the Senate Select Committee on Violence in Schools and School Security following the mass shooting at Santa Fe High School south of Houston. Committee members heard testimony during four meetings in June and July on ways to improve school safety infrastructure, address mental health issues among students and consider controversial “red flag” policies that would take guns away from those deemed a risk to others.Several of the committee’s recommendations focused on “hardening” schools, adding funding for metal detectors and other security apparatuses on campuses. The committee also recommended that the state explore increasing financing for school marshal programs, which allow certified staffers to have access to firearms in schools. During its public hearings, committee members heard testimony that marshal programs can strain school budgets, since they require training and lockboxes for guns. The committee hopes to alleviate that strain with state funds, though it didn’t give specific dollar amounts for any of its recommendations.The recommendations were in line with Republican Gov. Greg Abbott‘s proposal to expand the school marshal program, included in a 44-page school safety action plan he released soon after the Santa Fe shooting.School marshal programs are one of two ways the state allows schools to arm teachers. School districts can also allocate “guardians” who can carry firearms in schools without a minimum amount of training. The committee recommended considering a minimum training requirement for school guardians.A proposal raised by state Sen. Don Huffines, R-Dallas, during the committee’s June 12 meeting to arm school staff with rifles was not in the recommendations.Committee members also pushed for increased mental health resources for students, including expanding mental health first aid training for school staff who interact with students and videoconferencing psychiatric help to students who wouldn’t otherwise have access to mental health professionals.Testimony from counselors and school social workers showed a pattern of schools using counselors for administrative work. Committee members recommended considering legislation that would enumerate counselor duties. They also proposed looking into ways to make counselors more accessible to students, particularly in rural areas with fewer school personnel.Stephanie Rubin, CEO of advocacy and research group Texans Care for Children, lauded the focus on mental health care, but expressed concern at the report’s lack of specific methods to implement its recommendations. In a statement released soon after the report, Rubin said the Legislature will still have to work out several of the details in the upcoming session in 2019 for any substantive change to occur.“We hope state leaders build on these efforts and take real action, with meaningful increases in state funding, to support student mental health,” the statement said.The committee did not recommend the implementation of “red flag” laws, which Abbott proposed in his school safety recommendations but Patrick has fiercely challenged. Instead, members proposed clarifying legislation on whether people convicted of domestic violence can own firearms to begin with and on returning guns to people who have been detained but declared not to be a risk to themselves or others.That drew a rebuke from Mike Collier, the Democrat who is challenging Patrick for lieutenant governor.“Red flag laws work, and the only language in this report regarding red flag laws is the recommendation to clarify current statutes,” Collier said in a statement.last_img read more