No firm plans for Breeders’ Cup heroine Tarnawa | Racing News

first_imgHowever, Tarnawa put that particular anomaly right in spectacular style in Kentucky – and speaking from his County Kildare yard on Sunday morning, Weld spoke of his immense pride and delight.“The Breeders’ Cup Turf is always one of the best races in the world and it was lovely to win it,” the trainer said on Racing TV’s Luck on Sunday programme.“It feels exceptionally good – the Breeders’ Cup was the one major event I wanted to win a big race at.- Advertisement – Dermot Weld is unsure what the future holds for Tarnawa after the filly provided him with his first Breeders’ Cup victory at Keeneland on Saturday.The master of Rosewell House has enjoyed huge success on the international stage, with a pair of Melbourne Cup victories and multiple top-level wins in America featuring on his illustrious CV – but a Breeders’ Cup winner had so far eluded him.- Advertisement – Explaining the sequence of events, Weld added: “Keeneland is a very tight turf track and it’s nice to know your horse as you need everything in your favour when you’re going into a race like the Breeders’ Cup Turf.“She always breaks slowly, so we decided on Thursday that we’d school her out of the stalls on the track and arranged with Christophe Soumillon to do that, which he duly did.“She jumped out nicely for him, Christophe was delighted with her, but an hour later I heard he was positive for Covid-19, so we needed a replacement jockey.“I was extremely satisfied with my filly and the decision was whether to go for an American rider or wait and get a European rider.“Javier Castellano has ridden winners for me and was available, Frankie Dettori was riding in the race (on Lord North) and I just thought ‘why not go with Colin Keane’. He was out there, he was riding in the Mile beforehand and he’s an outstanding young rider.“Colin has only ridden for me once before, at Cork – usually he’s riding against me.”Weld admitted the success was tinged with sadness as he thought of his former stable jockey Pat Smullen, who died earlier this year following a long battle with cancer.“The only aspect of the great victory of last night that was sad was thinking how much Pat would have enjoyed riding Tarnawa,” said Weld.“They were basically made for each other because she’s a tough filly and a classic stayer with speed – she’s the sort of horse that Pat rode exceptionally well.”On whether Tarnawa will return to race on as a five-year-old in 2021, the trainer added: “No decision has been made on whether she will be retired or whether she’ll be racing again next year.“We’ll see how she comes out of the race. His Highness (Aga Khan, owner) has a history of retiring fillies at the end of their three or four-year-old career, so whether an exception will be made for her or not, I don’t know.“She’s an amazing filly in that she won on very fast ground in America last night and she’s won on very heavy, testing ground a few weeks ago in Paris.” – Advertisement – “Nowadays I train 80 horses, so it’s a much smaller team than most of the opposition, so you’ve got to pick your spots very carefully and very well.”Tarnawa’s chances of success had seemingly suffered a significant blow in earlier in the week after jockey Christophe Soumillon, who had steered her to successive Group One wins in France this autumn, was forced to miss the ride after testing positive for Covid-19.However, recently-crowned Irish champion jockey Colin Keane proved a more than able deputy.- Advertisement –last_img read more

US plan paints grim picture of flu pandemic

first_img The New York Times, which obtained a recent draft of the plan, said it describes a worst-case scenario in which the flu would kill more than 1.9 million Americans, put 8.5 million in hospitals, and cost more than $450 billion. The administration has said it has 4.3 million treatment courses of oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and is aiming for 20 million. However, infectious disease expert Michael T. Osterholm said the draft plan obtained by the Times is out of date. “There have been tremendous improvements in the plan over the last week to 10 days,” an Oct 9 report in the Washington Post quoted Osterholm as saying. He is director of the University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, publisher of this site. Osterholm confirmed that the plan predicts a death toll as high as 1.9 million, with as many as half of all Americans getting sick. The new draft predicts that an emerging pandemic in Asia, where widespread avian flu has killed more than 60 people and generated fear of an epidemic, would be likely to reach US shores in a few months or even weeks, the Times said in an Oct 8 report. Quarantines and travel restrictions, while recommended, probably would not postpone the disease’s arrival “by more than a month or two.” According to the Times, the plan says the nation should have the capacity to produce 600 million doses of vaccine within 6 months, more than 10 times the current capacity. It also calls for a national stockpile of 133 million treatment courses of antiviral drugs. One section of the plan, the Times reported, describes a hypothetical scenario in which severe respiratory illness erupts in a village overseas in April, reaches the United States in June, and triggers small outbreaks around the nation by July. When scientists isolate the virus, as the scenario goes, they determine that the avian flu vaccine developed in advance will provide only partial protection. Aug 26, 2004, CIDRAP News story on earlier draft of the US pandemic plan Release of the draft plan has been expected for weeks. HHS Secretary Mike Leavitt, now visiting Southeast Asia to promote pandemic preparedness, said the plan would be released in a few days, according to an Associated press (AP) report published today. Under the plan, he told the newspaper, the military probably would be used to help move critical supplies and guard vaccination centers. But the document foresees only a small role for quarantines, and many decisions on how to manage disruptions and shortages would be made by local, not national, officials. Leavitt is accompanied on his tour by World Health Organization Director-General Lee Jong-Wook. On the crucial question of who would get vaccine first in a pandemic, the plan’s answer is workers who make the vaccines and flu drugs, along with medical personnel caring for flu patients, the Times story said. Following them would be the elderly and severely ill, pregnant women, transplant and AIDS patients, and parents of babies. Firefighters and government leaders would be next. Those numbers suggest that the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is taking a more somber view of the risks than it did in the previous draft plan, released in August 2004. That document cited earlier estimates that pandemic flu could cause between 89,000 and 207,000 deaths in the United States. The document says a pandemic could overwhelm hospitals, touch off riots at vaccination clinics, and lead to power and food shortages, the newspaper said. Until recently, the plan regarded a pandemic as “more like an earthquake or hurricane,” he told the Post. But a pandemic is an event that unfolds over 12 to 18 months, and the plan is now “in flux,” he said. In related news, Leavitt said during his Southeast Asian visit that the United States is pleased with Thailand’s cooperation in battling avian flu, according to an Agence France-Presse report today. Leavitt said the US wants “to have that same relationship with others in the world.” Oct 10, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – A not-yet-released version of the Bush administration’s plan for dealing with an influenza pandemic predicts that such an event could exact an enormous toll in life and wealth, according to recent newspaper reports. See also: But according to the Post story, HHS spokeswoman Christina Pearson said the agency is still getting comments on the plan, and releasing it now would be “totally premature.”last_img read more