Video: ESPN Aired An Incredibly Emotional Tribute To Chris Fowler

first_imgThe College GameDay crew in Columbus Ohio.ESPN College GameDayAfter serving as the host of ESPN’s College GameDay for 25 years, Chris Fowler has moved on to focus on his duties as play-by-play announcer for ABC/ESPN’s prime time Saturday night games. While Rece Davis should fill in admirably, GameDay definitely won’t be the same. To pay tribute to Fowler, GameDay put together an amazing feature piece, narrated by Tom Rinaldi. After the piece, Fowler joined his old GameDay crew, and Davis, on stage. Things got pretty emotional when Fowler discussed his relationship with Lee Corso, who he spent all 25 years with on the show. He even gave Corso a kiss on the cheek.It is getting a bit dusty in here this morning. We’ll miss you, Chris.last_img read more

Brian Kelly Explains Why Notre Dame’s Partnering With Bleacher Report

first_imgA picture Notre Dame's video about Bleacher Report partnership.Bleacher Report.Bleacher Report and Notre Dame announced a “groundbreaking partnership” for social media content on Thursday.From Notre Dame’s release:Bleacher Report, a preeminent next generation content creation company, has reached an agreement with University of Notre Dame football for an exclusive social content partnership throughout the season. The B/R social team will be embedded with the football program in South Bend and travel with the team to road games during the entire season to create custom content for the program’s national fan base.The collaboration will consist of full behind-the- scenes access to the Notre Dame football team including practice, locker room, game day activities, home and away games, travel, academic classrooms and a wide array of student and campus life. The array of content will include a weekly video feature, Facebook Live streams, short shareable social packages and game day Snapchat takeovers, distributed across Bleacher Report’s website and Team Stream mobile app — reaching more than 250 million users — along with B/R social platforms with an audience of more than 200 million fans.At a press conference this morning, Kelly explained the benefits of partnering with B/R for his program.Brian Kelly on Bleacher Report deal: “This gives us a unique relationship that nobody else has in college football.”— JJ Stankevitz (@JJStankevitz) August 5, 2016Kelly says, flat out, the relationship with Bleacher Report allows them to reach their targeted audience. More so than the Showtime deal.— Mike Vorel (@mikevorel) August 5, 2016As I expected, Kelly says the Bleacher Report media deal requires much less time/effort than the Showtime documentary series did.— Stephen Brooks (@StephenM_Brooks) August 5, 2016Notre Dame did a documentary with SHOWTIME last season. Florida State is doing a similar documentary this season.The Fighting Irish released this video about their partnership with Bleacher Report. The start of something new.@NDFootball x @BleacherReportComing this fall… #BRxND pic.twitter.com/8dbeU1jHvN— Notre Dame Football (@NDFootball) August 4, 2016Notre Dame opens its season on Sunday, Sept. 4 against Texas.last_img read more

HOLLYWOOD STUDIOS TORRENT OF LAWSUITS TARGET ILLEGAL DOWNLOADERS IN CANADA

first_img Twitter Over the past year, Hollywood TV and movie studios have been suing “hundreds of everyday” Canadians for allegedly sharing and downloading copyrighted material, an Atlantic-based law firm says in a press release.“A torrent of lawsuits are descending on Canadians accused of online file sharing. If you get one of these, it can’t be ignored,” privacy lawyer and partner at McInnes Cooper David T.S. Fraser said in a tweet on Monday.He stressed this wasn’t a hoax and that people receiving a piece of registered mail from a Hollywood studio were actually being sued for copyright infringement. Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Ignoring it won’t make it go away, he said, warning that people who do could pay a high price.People who illegally downloaded material — not for commercial use — could be forced to pay damages of up to $5,000, according to Canada’s Copyright Modernization Act. And users found to have illegally downloaded movies to make money could face fines of up to $20,000.center_img Advertisement Login/Register With: This photo released by HBO shows Kit Harington as Jon Snow, left, and Emilia Clarke as Daenerys Targaryen in a scene from “Game of Thrones,” which premiered its eighth season on Sunday. (HBO via AP) Advertisementlast_img read more

More On The Rate Of Domestic Violence Arrests Among NFL Players

In July, I wrote a piece titled “The Rate of Domestic Violence Arrests Among NFL Players,” which has been getting a lot of attention recently — some of it missing the point.I based the analysis in my article on USA Today’s NFL Arrests Database, combined with data from the Bureau of Justice Statistics’ Arrest Data Analysis Tool and some historical data gleaned from the National Incident-Based Reporting System and a variety of BJS reports on domestic violence. The main points I made were:For most crimes, NFL players have extremely low arrest rates relative to national averages.Their relative arrest rate for domestic violence is much higher than for other crimes.Although the arrest rate for domestic violence may appear low relative to the national average for 25- to 29-year-old men, it is probably high relative to NFL players’ income level (more than $75,000 per year) and poverty rate (0 percent).But the article has been cited by a number of people to support the proposition that the NFL does not have an unusually high domestic violence rate. While I think this is a fair characterization of my intermediate results — the arrest rate I noted was 55.4 percent of the national average for 25- to 29-year-old men as suggested by the USA Today arrest data and rough number of players in the NFL — it’s misleading when taken out of context.Let’s be more explicit about the different assumptions that can affect that bottom-line comparison. For that analysis, I generally tried to lean toward assumptions favorable to the NFL, with the intention of showing that, even under those assumptions, the NFL appeared to have a “downright extraordinary” arrest rate for domestic violence.But there are still a lot of unknowns in the data and lot of choices to be made about what exactly we’re comparing to what.Reliability of arrest dataA lot of readers, commenters, emailers, tweeters, media, etc., have questioned the USA Today NFL arrest data. They’re right to be skeptical. There’s a good chance the arrest data is incomplete — particularly when it comes to marginal players who are only attached to the NFL briefly.When I wrote that piece, I was concerned about both over- and under-inclusion: The pool of NFL players who would pop up in the database might be even larger than the estimate based on roster limits (because some players come and go, and players are frequently dropped and replaced throughout the year), but it might also miss some players whose arrests flew under the radar.I hand-sampled a number of cases and found that they appeared to include many marginal players with minimal attachment to the league. With the NFL being so intensely followed, I thought the USA Today data set was probably pretty comprehensive.But some readers have made some good cases for why the arrest count the database produces could be low.On the pure data-collection level, I’ve corresponded with an enterprising reader who compared the frequency of arrests in the USA Today data for players with more games played vs. those with few games played. He found the first group had a much higher arrest rate. From this, he concluded that the database was probably missing arrests for lesser-known players, and he determined that basing the arrest rate on an assumption of 53 players per team (rather than the 80 players per team I used) was the most accurate approach (only coincidentally corresponding to the number of players on the roster during the year).His case seemed strong to me but not conclusive: It’s possible that marginally attached players are arrested at a lower rate. For example, marginally attached players may be younger (unsigned rookies) or older (borderline veterans) than typical players, and thus less likely to have families (younger) or be aged out of the most likely group to commit domestic violence (older). Additionally, we don’t know what’s driving the NFL’s overall domestic violence arrest rate, and I can imagine plausible scenarios in which regular players are more likely to commit and/or get arrested for the offense.Another potential problem, as several readers pointed out, is that virtually any NFL arrest data may understate the equivalent arrest rate in a less privileged population. In other words, NFL players who are involved in domestic violence incidents could be better at avoiding arrests than the general public. Relatedly, it’s possible there have been arrests that were either avoided or kept off the media’s radar because of team and/or league machinations.Whether any of those possibilities are likely or not, we should be explicit as to how our position on them affects our results.An appropriate pool for comparisonIf we want a bottom-line NFL vs. X number, the pool you use for X is obviously quite meaningful. But it’s difficult to figure out which pool we should be comparing to, and even if we do know what pool we want to use, figuring out their arrest rate (especially for domestic violence crimes) can be quite difficult.In my article, I primarily compare NFL arrest rates to arrest rates for 25- to 29-year-old men, and then I compared their arrest rate for domestic violence to their arrest rates for other crimes (it’s about four times higher). While we don’t have arrest data broken down by income, we do have such breakdowns for victimization rates (based on BJS survey data). I compared the relative domestic violence victimization rate for people from households making $75,000 or more to both the overall domestic violence victimization rate (it’s 39 percent as high) and rate for ages 20 to 34 (20 percent as high). It’s impossible to compare this directly to the relative NFL arrest rates with precision, but at least it gives us some benchmark for how income level may affect domestic violence incidents.In addition to inherent murkiness of trying to compare across different types of data, there are a few other possible problems with the $75,000 or more per year comparison.First, NFL players have a number of advantages that your typical member of a household making $75,000 and up each year may not. That’s the highest income group I had data for, but NFL players are typically wealthier than that. NFL players spend a good portion of the year in an extremely structured environment. They have extremely low rates of drug and alcohol abuse (especially relative to arrest rates for drug and alcohol-related crimes), and alcohol and drugs tend to be big risk factors for domestic violence.On the other hand, NFL players didn’t necessarily have the advantages that a lot of $75,000-and-up earners do. NFL players may be more likely than those earners to have come from difficult backgrounds, or to have experienced or observed abuse in their families, and in general to have missed out on the privileges associated with coming from a wealthier background.Finally, there are some differences in the data that we don’t know enough about to say what their effect might be, such as:Are victims from higher-income households more or less likely to make police reports that lead to arrests?How does the extreme wealth disparity between NFL players and their domestic partners affect the power dynamics that may lead to more or fewer arrests?Note: None of this has to be the case, and I haven’t studied these factors or their effects on criminality. But they are questions that affect our assumptions, and affect what type of comparison we should be making and how we should interpret it.Even if we could settle on a perfectly representative pool for comparison, getting even approximate figures for each group is extremely difficult. For example, as I noted in the original article, the BJS’s Intimate Partner Violence reports don’t include breakdowns by income anymore. So we have to make reasonable estimates based on several related numbers. This process has a lot of wiggle room in it as well, so we should be clear to look at what kinds of proxies lead to what kinds of results.Different combinations of assumptionsWith so much murkiness in both our data and our aims, the best thing to do is to look at a range of assumptions and see whether there are patterns that are apparent independent of such choices.Let’s first combine the possible issues with the USA Today data and represent them as a single number — which we’ll call “percentage of arrests captured by USA Today data” — representing its completeness with regards to actual arrests, as well as arrests that were otherwise avoided.Likewise, let’s combine the issues about comparison groups into a single percentage representing the bottom-line arrest rate of our comparable population (whatever it might be) relative to our 25- to 29-year-old average. In other words, we’re using one metric to represent each group by our best estimate for its relative arrest rate (which we can compare to benchmarks).Then we combine these two metrics with the information we have (NFL Arrest Rates in USA Today database, approximate number of NFL players and arrest rates for the general population), like so:We calculate the known NFL arrest rate and scale it to per 100,000 by taking the NFL arrests per year in the database, multiplied by 100,000, and divided by the number of NFL players per year (approximately 2,560).We divide this by the “percentage of arrests captured by USA Today data” (by assumption, per above).We gather data on the known national arrest rate for 25- to 29- year-olds, which is per 100,000.We divide this by our estimated relative arrest rate of a comparable population (by assumption, per above).Finally, we calculate the ratio between 2) and 4) and subtract 100 percent — this tells us how our estimated NFL arrest rate compares to the rate we estimate for a comparable population.Now we can chart the result of this calculation for given values of A and B as heat maps. Even if we assume extremely incomplete arrest data, the NFL’s overall arrest rate is still very low relative to the national average for its age range. But if we hold the NFL to an extremely high standard, we can still find its arrest rate to be subpar.I’ve used the same color scheme for both of these (100 percent = white). So it should be obvious that the NFL’s doing much worse with domestic violence arrests than with arrests overall.Note that the difference between assumptions can be an order of magnitude or more. Under a favorable set of assumptions, the NFL looks better than average; under an unfavorable set of assumptions, it’s doing terribly.For example, if you compare NFL players only to the national average for 25- to 29-year-old men, and you assume that the USA Today database is pretty much complete, you arrive at the 55.4 percent figure.On the other hand, if you assume that the NFL’s domestic violence arrest rate should be proportional to the overall arrest rate, you can see that the NFL has a “domestic violence problem,” whether the USA Today data is complete or not. This was essentially the scenario I was leading to in my initial article. read more

Drew Brees Deserves Credit For The Saints Running Game Too

Excludes plays that are obvious passing or rushing situations: when a team is down by at least two scores, is in a short-yardage situation, is at the goal line or is showing three or more WRs; or when the game is in the final six minutes.Source: ESPN Stats & Information Group Tennessee3.931.0239 Indianapolis3.620.02727 Cleveland4.123.21022 New Orleans5.121.5%125 San Francisco4.127.31316 LA Rams4.522.6324 Atlanta4.217.3732 New England4.427.7515 Carolina3.642.0282 Denver4.021.21826 Arizona3.444.0301 NY Giants4.033.9168 TeamYards/Rush8+ Box RateYards/Rush8+ Box Oakland4.137.5113 Philadelphia4.534.547 Detroit3.318.03131 Chicago4.119.51429 Washington3.627.92614 Minnesota4.028.31912 NY Jets4.030.52010 Kansas City4.722.9223 Dallas4.336.665 Pittsburgh4.037.2174 LA Chargers3.924.12221 RANK Teams don’t crowd the line to stop New OrleansNFL teams by rushing yards from running backs in 2017, with how often each offense faced at least eight defenders in the box Cincinnati3.719.62528 Tampa Bay3.525.22918 Jacksonville4.236.296 Buffalo4.028.92111 Seattle3.318.23230 Miami4.128.01513 Baltimore4.227.0817 Green Bay4.124.61220 Houston3.824.82419 After more than a decade of tearing teams to shreds through the air, the New Orleans Saints made a stunning change this season to their offense: They grounded their arsenal. The 2017 Saints are the most dominant rushing team in football, comfortably leading the league in yards gained by running backs. So the obvious solution for the Carolina Panthers in Sunday’s wild-card game is to stack the box with too many defenders for the Saints offensive line to block.But this won’t happen. And here’s what makes the New Orleans offense something that previously existed only in a defensive coordinator’s night terror: Drew Brees is still one of the NFL’s most effective passers, even when he’s leading the game’s best rushing attack. To put it another way, the Saints are winning because of their running game, and the Saints running game is winning because of Brees.Despite racking up more than 2,000 rushing yards by mostly Mark Ingram (1,124) and Alvin Kamara (728), the running backs and the team’s offensive line rarely had to account for eight or more defenders near the line of scrimmage. Saints’ opponents have been unwilling to commit to stopping the run — which is what you generally do against great running teams. To measure this fairly across the league, we first need to get rid of all the obvious pass or run scenarios based on down and distance or game situation.1We threw out any play where there were more than two wide receivers in the formation or an offense was down two or more scores because this suggests to a defense that a pass is coming. We also dumped all short-yardage plays (1 yard from a first down) and goal-line situations (3 or fewer yards from the end zone). Lastly, we ignored the final six minutes of the game because an offense’s intentions here are frequently obvious — whether it’s to play catch-up (pass) or to kill clock (run). Looking at what’s left, the Saints faced stacked fronts of eight or more defenders on just 37 of their 172 rushing plays, according to ESPN’s Stats & Information Group — a rate of 21.5 percent that’s 25th in the league. The average for all NFL teams is 28 percent. The Saints weren’t the only team that seemed to be preventing defenses from loading the box, but they had by far the most running success. Like the Saints, the Chiefs and Falcons ranked in the top five in yards per pass, which was enough to keep defenses from committing to stopping the run. While the Rams appear to fit this profile too, they played so many three-plus WR sets that teams simply could not commit that many defenders to the line of scrimmage.Playing against conventional fronts even when employing run-friendly personnel (no more than two WRs) is the key to the Saints’ success in generating yards before contact. Their running backs led the NFL in 2.85 yards on average before encountering a defender. Yes, a lot of this is good vision by the backs and effective offensive line blocking. But the fact that there weren’t often too many defenders at the line of scrimmage was Kamara and Ingram’s secret weapon.On paper, Brees’s role in the offense seems more minimized than ever: 23 touchdown passes after nine straight years of 30 or more, just 536 pass attempts after averaging 656 the prior seven seasons, and a Saints career low of 4,334 yards. But this isn’t 2015 Peyton Manning clearly wheezing to the finish line and needing the team to dominate in other areas in order to win. Brees, 38, led the NFL this year in yards per pass attempt, and his 103.9 passer rating was his best since 2013.Look no further than the Saints’ opponent on Sunday for an example of a team that has to deal with stacked fronts because defenses don’t fear the passing game. Carolina running backs had to face at least eight defenders in the box on 42 percent of the rushing plays in our sample, the second-highest rate in the league. And why not? Cam Newton ranks 21st in passing yards per attempt and 24th in passer rating, and he’s more a threat when he’s running himself.But even Ben Roethlisberger’s Steelers (37.2 percent) and Tom Brady’s Patriots (27.7 percent) were forced to send running backs into defenses with extra run-stoppers at the line of scrimmage far more often than the Saints. Maybe defenses have been slow to adjust to the Saints’ new offensive model, but Brees’s presence helping the running game find room is no recent phenomenon. Since 2010, the Saints’ average of 4.5 yards per rush by their running backs is the third-best rate in football.The even worse news for Carolina on Sunday is that perhaps no team has been more flustered by the multidimensional Saints than these Panthers. In their two prior meetings, both Saints wins, Carolina allowed 149 and 148 rushing yards. Those are the two worst performances by the Panthers’ run defense all year. And it’s not like they’re stopping Brees either: The future Hall of Famer posted a 117.8 passer rating with four TD passes in those two contests. The Panthers seem to have been caught in between the new Saints and the old-model Saints — and able to stop neither.Check out our latest NFL predictions. read more

ReImagined Series Is Back With More Unexpected Covers

first_img Twitter ReImagined Is Back With More Covers reimagined-series-back-more-unexpected-covers NETWORK ERRORCannot Contact ServerRELOAD YOUR SCREEN OR TRY SELECTING A DIFFERENT VIDEO Sep 17, 2018 – 6:01 pm GRAMMY ReImagined Returns With More Covers ReImagined Series Is Back With More Unexpected Covers News Facebook A new group of artists breathe fresh life into their favorite GRAMMY-winning or GRAMMY-nominated songsAna YglesiasGRAMMYs Sep 17, 2018 – 6:05 pm The Recording Academy is coming back with another season of ReImagined, a video series where artists bring a fresh take on classic GRAMMY-winning/nominated songs by their favorite artists – from the Record Of The Year, Song Of The Year, Best Rock Song, Best R&B Song and Best Rap Song categories. NETWORK ERRORCannot Contact ServerRELOAD YOUR SCREEN OR TRY SELECTING A DIFFERENT VIDEO Sep 18, 2018 – 2:47 pm Shawn James Covers “I Try”: GRAMMY ReImagined The relaunch of the series features six new unexpected covers to be released monthly, kicking off Tues. Sept. 17 with Shawn James. The blues/folk artist brings a passionate folksy cover of Macy Gray’s “I Try,” which won Best Female Pop Vocal Performance at the 43rd GRAMMY Awards.”I chose to cover ‘I Try’ by Macy Gray because of the emotional heaviness of the lyrics,” James shared. “I think that it can relate to most people on some level or another regarding love, loss, addiction and the reaction to dealing with those things. I wanted to reimagine the song with adding a depth of sorrow and darkness to not just the lyrics but also the ambience and delivery of the performance.” Email In the past, singer/songwriter Devon Terrell has soulfully delivered The Weeknd’s “Can’t Feel My Face,” and alt-rock band Our Last Night has jammed out to Sam Smith’s “Stay With Me,” among others.The upcoming list of performances will surely pack another emotive punch and run the gamut of sound. Victory Boyd, the young Central Park singer discovered by Jay-Z, takes on Seal’s “Kiss From A Rose” and Damien Escobar, the “hip-hop violinist,” gives his spin on Paramore’s “Ain’t It Fun,” to name a few.Subscribe to our YouTube channel and visit our video page to watch each ReImagined episode, along with other exclusive content, as it’s released.ReImagined Schedule:Sept. 18: Shawn James, “I Try” by Macy GrayOct. 16: Donna Missal, “Iris” by Goo Goo DollsNov. 13: Kimberly Nichole, “Black Hole Sun” by SoundgardenDec. 11: RuthAnne, “Waterfalls” by TLCJan. 8: Victory Boyd, “Kiss From A Rose” by SealFeb. 5: Damien Escobar, “Ain’t It Fun” by ParamoreRead morelast_img read more

Masihuzzaman made Air chief

first_imgAir marshal Masihuzzaman Serniabat. Photo: UNB Air marshal Masihuzzaman Serniabat will take over the command of the Bangladesh Air Force (BAF) from 12 June, said a release from the directorate of Inter-Services Public Relations (ISPR) on Tuesday.He is set to take over the command the BAF for three years as the defence ministry issued a notification in this connection, the release added.“Air vice marshal Masihuzzaman Serniabat, BBP, OSP, NDU, PSC, GD (P) has been promoted to the post of air marshal for three years as chief officer of Bangladesh Air Force. This order will come into effect from 12 June,” the release reads.last_img read more

Temperature likely to go up as downpour comes to a halt

first_imgKolkata: The temperature in the city may go up in the next 48 hours, predicted the Regional Meteorological Centre at Alipore on Friday.According to the weather office, there is a possibility of scattered rainfall in the city and some South Bengal districts as well. North Bengal districts will continue to receive heavy to very heavy rainfall in the next two days, the weather office said.The temperature in the city and its adjoining areas has dipped for the past few days, due to rain caused by the arrival of monsoon current in the region. According to the prediction, there will be a marginal rise in the mercury in the next two days. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedThe temperature this season touched 40 degrees due to the advent of westerly winds, which were bringing a heat wave to the city. This occurred after the monsoon current got stalled for few days in the last week.The situation improved after the monsoon current got active and brought moderate to heavy rainfall in the South Bengal districts. This came as a relief to the city dwellers and also the people from the districts in South Bengal, from the scorching summer heat. Also Read – Naihati: 10 councillors return to TMC from BJPAccording to the weather office, the rise in temperature may also lead to uncomfortable weather, with the relative humidity going up.A senior official of the weather office said that North Bengal is expected to receive heavy to very heavy rainfall in the next few days as well, while in Kolkata and most parts of South Bengal, the mercury may soar high.However, there is a prediction of thunderstorm, accompanied with gusty wind and lightning, in the South Bengal districts.It may be mentioned here that various North Bengal districts have been receiving heavy rainfall for past few days, as a result of which an alert was also issued to the local administration to take adequate steps to check any untoward incident.last_img read more

December 31 2004 The Nudging Space Arcology is a

first_imgDecember 31, 2004The Nudging Space Arcology is a variation of Soleri’s earlier design ‘Two Suns’. The important design element here is the ‘Apsedra’ which combines two architectural forms, the ‘Apse’ and the ‘Excedra’. One way to visualize this is to picture a halved artichoke whose upper third has been sliced off and it’s choke removed. Its blades are separated but still remain attached to the lower center.The Nudging Space Arcology is a variation of Soleri’s earlier design ‘Two Suns’. The important design element here is the ‘Apsedra’ which combines two architectural forms, the ‘Apse’ and the ‘Excedra’. One way to visualize this is to picture a halved artichoke whose upper third has been sliced off and it’s choke removed. Its blades are separated but still remain attached to the lower center. The psychosomatic side is revealed by the influence the curved space has on our relationship with things and people. The Apsedra encourages conviviality by offering a focusing convergence (its center of centers) where awareness and dialoging are enhanced.“In nature, as an organism evolves it increases in complexity and it also becomes a more compact or miniaturized system. Similarly a city should function as a living system. Arcology, architecture and ecology as one integral process, is capable of demonstrating positive response to the many problems of urban civilization, population, pollution, energy and natural resource depletion, food scarcity and quality of life. Arcology recognizes the necessity of the radical reorganization of the sprawling urban landscape into dense, integrated, three-dimensional cities in order to support the complex activities that sustain human culture. The city is the necessary instrument for the evolution of humankind.” Paolo Soleri – [More on Arcology Theory]. [Scanned image of original drawing by Paolo Soleri & text: Cosanti Foundation]last_img read more