On the Blogs: ‘I Have No Idea Who Would Put Their Money Here’

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Think Progress:The Navajo Generating Station is facing a future familiar to many coal-fired power plants, struggling to compete with smaller, more nimble natural gas-fired generators, wind farms, and solar arrays.“You know the old saying, ‘You make money if you buy low and sell high’? They’re buying high and selling lower,” said David Schlissel, director of resource planning analysis at the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA).If the Navajo Generating Station shuts down, locals will lose some 800 jobs, both at the plant and in the nearby Kayenta mine, which supplies coal to the generating station. Facing unemployment rates upwards of 40 percent, the Navajo and Hopi tribes are eager to protect those jobs, to say nothing of the revenue the operation provides.“The Navajo Nation is so dependent on the jobs and the revenue for their budget. It’s really sad because, looking forward, it just doesn’t seem to be a sustainable economic enterprise,” Schlissel said. “I have no idea who would put their money here.”More: Embattled Navajo coal plant is a preview of what’s ahead as coal declines across the U.S. On the Blogs: ‘I Have No Idea Who Would Put Their Money Here’last_img read more

At least I can be Wimbledon champion for two years, says Halep

first_img(REUTERS) – Simon Halep is trying to look on the bright side regarding the suspension of the tennis season due to the coronavirus pandemic, which means at least she will be referred to as reigning Wimbledon champion for two years.The Romanian former world number one produced a flawless performance to beat Serena Williams in last year’s final but this week’s cancellation of the grass-court Grand Slam means she will not get to defend her title this summer.Halep, 28, is currently back in her native Romania where she has been locked down at home for 22 days, only popping out briefly to jog around the grounds of her residence. Asked about the Wimbledon cancellation, announced on Wednesday, Halep told Eurosport’s Tennis Legends vodcast: “I take it positively, because I am now the defending champion for two years. So, I have to live with that for one more year so that’s a good thing again.“I am excited that I will be able to play the first match on (the) Tuesday, I think, on Centre Court. So, I really want to make this experience. It’s going to be great for sure.”The WTA Tour and ATP Tour have been shut down until the middle of July, at least, but Halep is geared up for a longer suspension of the season, possibly the whole year. “I know that the worst scenario in my head is that this year is going to be cancelled and, yeah, I’m sure we’re going to overcome this period if we listen and stay home safely,” she said.“For the moment, I think it’s going to be longer than July. We hope for the U.S. Open (scheduled for August 31 to September 13) but it’s not sure because New York is struggling now.” LOTS OF SLEEPAfter so many years jet-setting around the globe, Halep said the enforced time-off from the Tour had been welcome in some respects, even if the circumstances were dreadful.“It’s the longest period that I haven’t touched a racquet. Not the ball, the racquet – since Dubai,” she said. “And I want to keep it that way for one more month. “I just kept it very safe because I am a little bit scared about it. And I just want to stay chilled. I wake up at around 10 or 11. It’s very good to have a lot of sleep.“No alarm clock, no schedule, so I just wake up. I have a late breakfast and then I do some running here in the complex because we are allowed to do it; it’s a private residence.“In the house I work on my core and my other exercises. So, every day I am working and I feel fit, yes.”Halep said that while she missed her job, it was right that sport had faded into the background at a time of global crisis.“It’s just a world problem and I just want to say that it’s safer that everything got cancelled. It’s not a small problem, it’s a huge problem. And we just have to listen to what they say, to stay home and being very safe,” she said.“Tennis is not everything in my life.”last_img read more